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Commentary

A tale of two wars: Yemen and Ukraine

As the UK strongly supports Ukraine against attack, Boris Johnson’s visit to Saudi Arabia this week raised the question “what about Yemen?”. The two wars are very different, politically and legally, but the Yemen war has important lessons about how an invasion can also harm the invader, writes the ELN’s Impact Director Jane Kinninmont.

18 March 2022 | Jane Kinninmont
Commentary

The US-Russia military hotline in Europe: Key principles for risk reduction from the US-Russia deconfliction measures in Syria

Despite diplomatic channels between Russia and Western countries narrowing in the aftermath of the invasion, in early March the US and Russia announced that they would establish a hotline to avoid miscalculation or escalation. Juliette Faure outlines key lessons from the US-Russia deconfliction measures in Syria starting in 2015.

17 March 2022 | Juliette Faure
Commentary

Changing the nuclear narrative

As nuclear weapons make headlines once more, the images and narratives that pervade focus on fear and panic leading to paralysing doom and political stasis. For sustained engagement and real-world change, Elizabeth Talerman and Shazeeda Bhola from The Nucleus Group write that a fundamental shift is required in how the nuclear conversation is framed — invoking hope instead of fear and identifying solutions and shared ambitions.

15 March 2022 | Shazeeda Bhola and Elizabeth Talerman
Commentary

Nuclear dangers of Russia’s war against Ukraine: Implications for multilateral nuclear diplomacy and recommendations for risk reduction

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine increases nuclear risks and represents a major setback for multilateral nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament diplomacy. To mitigate the risk of nuclear escalation, the P5 must demonstrate to the international community that they stand behind their joint affirmation that “a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought.”

Commentary

Reconsidering nuclear deterrence

As nuclear deterrence receives renewed attention, Ward Wilson reconsiders what we know about nuclear deterrence, examines what we don’t know, and thinks about what work still needs to be done. Wilson argues that greater emphasis needs to be put on psychology and neuroscience, examining past failures more closely, and comparing criminal deterrence and nuclear deterrence.

1 March 2022 | Ward Wilson