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Policy brief

The demise of the INF Treaty: What are the consequences for NATO

Drawing on their experience of working at NATO, Senior Associate Fellows Nicholas Williams and Simon Lunn explore parallels in the debate between the 1979 Dual Track decision and the current situation.

11 February 2019 | Simon Lunn and Nicholas Williams
Global Security|Conventional Arms Control|Defence|Deterrence|Europe|NATO|Nuclear Arms Control|Nuclear Disarmament|Nuclear Security|Risk Reduction|Russia-West Relations|Security|Transatlantic relations
Commentary

European options amidst the INF clash of the titans

The culmination of the yearlong INF drama, beset with mutual accusations, now places Europeans under enormous pressure to address the ensuing security challenges.

6 February 2019 | Katarzyna Kubiak
Euro-Atlantic Security|Arms Control|Defence|Deterrence|Germany|INF|NATO|Nuclear Arms Control|Nuclear Disarmament|Nuclear Weapons|Poland|Russia|Russia-West Relations|Security|Transatlantic relations|United States|ELN
Media coverage

ELN Chair, Lord Browne of Ladyton featured in The Independent

ELN Chair and founder writes on the importance of proper crisis management in preventing an unintended nuclear catastrophe.

13 November 2018
Global Security|Nuclear Arms Control|Nuclear Disarmament|Nuclear Security|Nuclear Weapons|Risk Reduction
Commentary

Kill the NPT Collapse Thesis

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is often alleged to be at risk of “crumbling” or "damaged beyond repair”. Kjølv Egeland, Fellow at the Norwegian Academy of International Law, argues that this fear-mongering is unfounded. The NPT is one of the most widely supported international agreements that exist today. The challenge facing its supporters is not damage-limitation or “protecting what we’ve got” but extending the disarmament norm.

20 July 2018 | Kjølv Egeland
Global Security|NPT|Nuclear Disarmament|Nuclear Weapons
Policy brief

Nuclear Responsibility: A New Framework to Assess U.S. and Russian Behaviour

Dr Heather Williams, Lecturer in the Defence Studies Department at King's College London (KCL) and Amelia Morgan, Research Assistant at KCL's Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) examine how the United States and Russia could become more responsible nuclear actors and strengthen the global nuclear order at a time when it is most fragile.

19 June 2018 | Heather Williams and Amelia Morgan
Euro-Atlantic Security|NPT|Nuclear Arms Control|Nuclear Disarmament|Nuclear Security|Nuclear Weapons|Risk Reduction|Russia|United States